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September 4th, 2014

Security_Sep02_BEveryone today seems to be constantly relying on their smartphones to help complete daily tasks which has resulted in the need to recharge subsequently increasing. And when you’re far from your charger, public charging kiosks can seem like a good substitute. However, this can lead to juice jacking of your smartphone. If this is news to you then let’s find out what juice jacking is and how you can avoid it.

What’s juice jacking?

Regardless of the kind of smartphone you have, whether it’s an Android, iPhone or BlackBerry, there is one common feature across all phones: the power supply and the data stream pass over the same cable. This setup allows for juice jacking during the charging process whereby user access is gained on your phone by leveraging the USB data/power cable to illegitimately access your phone’s data and/or inject malicious code onto the device.

The attack can be as simple as an invasion of privacy, wherein your phone pairs with a computer concealed within the charging kiosk and information such as private photos and contact information are transferred to a malicious device. However, on the other hand, it can also be as invasive as an injection of malicious code directly into your phone. According to security researchers at this year’s Black Hat security conference, your iPhone can be compromised within one minute of being plugged into a harmful charger.

Exposure to a malicious kiosk can also create a lingering security problem even without the immediate injection of malicious code. Once a device is paired to a computer, it can access a host of personal information on the device, including your address book, notes, photos, music, sms database, typing cache, and even initiate a full backup of your phone, all of which can be accessed wirelessly at anytime.

How do I avoid it?

The most effective precautions center around simply not charging your phone using a third-party system. Here are some tips to help you avoid using public kiosk charger:
  • Keep your devices topped off: Make it a habit to charge your phone at your home and office when you’re not actively using it or are just sitting at your desk working.
  • Carry a personal charger: Chargers have become very small and portable, from USB cables to power banks. Get one and throw it in your bag so you can charge your phone anytime you’re at the office or while on-the-go if you use a power bank.
  • Carry a backup battery: If you’re not keen on bringing a spare charger or power bank, you can opt to carry a full spare battery if your device has a removable battery.
  • Lock your phone: When your phone is truly locked as in inaccessible without the input of a pin or equivalent passcode, your phone should not be able to be paired with the device it’s connected to.
  • Power the phone down: This technique only works on phones on a model-by-model basis as some phones will, despite being powered down, still power on the entire USB circuit and allow access to the flash storage in the device.
  • Use power only USB cables: These cables are missing the two wires necessary for data transmission and have only the two wires for power transmission remaining. They will charge your device, but data transfer is made impossible.
Even the tiniest detail like charging your phone from a kiosk charger could affect the security of your device. While there are many substitutes to using a third-party system, ultimately the best defense against a compromised mobile device is awareness. Looking to learn more about today’s security and threats? Contact us today and see how we can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Security
September 3rd, 2014

BCP_Sep02_BBusiness operators know that when it comes to business continuity, everything is about time. It doesn’t matter if you can recover your business activities if this isn’t achieved in reasonable time. But what is considered “reasonable”? This is what the business impact analysis (BIA) determines. The BIA aims to find out what the recovery time objective is for each critical activity within an organization. With that in mind, let’s take a look at five tips for reliable business impact analysis.

Five tips for successful business impact analysis:

  1. Treat it as a (mini) project: Define the person responsible for BIA implementation and their authority. You should also define the scope, objective, and time frame in which it should be implemented.
  2. Prepare a good questionnaire: A well structured questionnaire will save you a lot of time and will lead to more accurate results. For example: BS (British standard) 25999-1 and BS 2599902 standards will provide you with a fairly good idea about what your questionnaire should contain. Identifying impacts resulting from disruptions, determining how these vary over time, and identifying resources needed for recovery are often covered in this. It’s also good practice to use both qualitative and quantitative questions to identify impacts.
  3. Define clear criteria: If you’re planning for interviewees to answer questions by assigning values, for instance from one to five, be sure to explain exactly what each of the five marks mean. It’s not uncommon that the same event is evaluated as catastrophic by lower-level employees while top management personnel assess the same event as having a more moderate impact.
  4. Collect data through human interaction: The best way to collect data is when someone skilled in business continuity performs an interview with those responsible for critical activity. This way lots of unresolved questions are cleared up and well-balanced answers are achieved. If interviews are not feasible, do at least one workshop where all participants can ask everything that is concerning them. Avoid the shortcut of simply sending out questionnaires.
  5. Determine the recovery time objectives only after you have identified all the interdependencies: For example, through the questionnaire you might conclude that for critical activity A the maximum tolerable period of disruption is two days; however, the maximum tolerable period of disruption for critical activity B is one day and it cannot recover without the help of critical activity A. This means that the recovery time objective for A will be one day instead of two days.
More often than not, the results of BIA are unexpected and the recovery time objective is longer than it was initially thought. Still, it’s the most effective way to get you thinking and preparing for the issues that could strike your business. When you are carrying out BIA make sure you put in the effort and hours to do it right. Looking to learn more about business continuity? Contact us today.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

September 3rd, 2014

OSX_Sep02_BAt one time or another everyone will need to take a screenshot. While most Apple users are aware that this function is possible, it can sometimes be difficult to take the screenshot you want. If this is a problem you have come across in the past, or if you are looking to learn how to take better screenshots, here are four tips that can help.

1. Know the shortcuts

As a Mac user, you likely know that the system is shortcut heavy. From navigating, to switching screens, to even opening programs, there is a shortcut for almost everything, including screenshots. With OS X there are a number of shortcuts associated with screenshots, and it is worthwhile knowing them:
  • Command + Shift + 3: Takes a screenshot of the entire screen.
  • Command + Ctrl + Shift + 3: Captures the entire screen and copies it to the clipboard. If you select Paste in a program like a word processor, it should paste the image.
  • Command + Shift + 4: Allows you to select the screenshot area and save it.
  • Command + Ctrl + Shift + 4: Allows you to select the screenshot area and copy it to the clipboard.
  • Command + Shift + 4 followed by spacebar: Captures an open window, folder, menu bar or desktop icon and saves it.
  • Command + Ctrl + Shift + 4 followed by spacebar: Captures an open window, folder, menu bar or desktop icon and copies it to the clipboard.
With Command + Shift + 4, you can also press and hold the spacebar once you have drawn a shape to move it around and select a different area. Also, pressing esc will cancel the screenshot selection if you have say selected too big of an area.

2. Including the cursor

Sometimes you may want to capture the mouse cursor pointing at something within a screenshot. You can do this by:
  1. Opening the Utilities folder on your computer. The quickest way to do this is to hit Command + Spacebar and typing Utilities.
  2. Scrolling down to the Grab app and opening it.
  3. Selecting Grab from the top right of your screen, followed by Preferences.
  4. Clicking on the cursor you would like to show up in your screenshots.
When you take the screenshot, the pointer will appear where you left it when the screenshot was taken.

3. Using Preview to take screenshots

If you have documents or files that contain images or text stored on your hard drive that you would like to take a screenshot of, the shortcuts will work fine, but did you know that you can use the Preview app to take screenshots as well?

If you right-click on the file that contains the information that you would like to take a screenshot of and select Open with followed by Preview, you will see the file open in preview mode. Clicking on File from the menu bar along the top followed by Take screenshot will allow you to capture the image.

When using this feature, you can select either:

  • From Selection… - Will allow you to draw a box to capture the screenshot.
  • From Window… - Will save the whole open window.
  • From Entire Screen… - Will capture the open window plus anything else on your screen.

4. Using the Grab app

Did you know that there is actually an app already installed on your computer that allows you to take screenshots? Most users rely on the shortcuts listed above, but these are actually related to the Grab app which is located in the Utilities folder.

If you open Grab (press Command + spacebar and type in 'Grab', select Grab under Applications), you can manually take screenshots using the app by:

  1. Clicking Capture.
  2. Selecting the type of screenshot from the drop-down menu.
The types of screenshot you can take with Grab include:
  1. Selection - Draw a box around the area of your screen you would like to capture.
  2. Window - Allows you to select a window to capture. Simply open the window and select Choose Window from the pop-up box.
  3. Screen - Will snap a screenshot of your entire screen.
  4. Timed Screen - Will start a timer then take an image of the screen in 10 seconds.
Looking to learn more about using OS X? Contact us today!
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS
August 27th, 2014

socialmedia_Aug26_BMany businesses rely on visuals to sell their products. From bakeries to hotels, an attractive product will bring in the customers and ultimately profits. This is why social media services like Instagram have become so popular. Business owners are increasingly wanting to find out how they too can create high quality images on the mobile platform.

The truth behind some of Instagram's best images

Those awesome Instagram photos we see aren't always taken using mobile phones. Instead, many users use digital cameras which offer much better image quality. You can capture some amazing shots with a higher end DSLR cameras with multiple lenses.

If you have one of these cameras and are looking to create high-quality images for Instagram, or any other social media site, you may be slightly confused as to how to get the images onto the platform - especially since many of us use this via the mobile app. To make uploading a little easier, here is a brief guide detailing how to get images from your digital camera onto Instagram.

1. Transfer and process images

Once you have taken photos with your camera, you will need to get them off of your camera's memory and onto your computer's hard drive. Most camera's have apps that allow you to do this, so be sure to follow the instructions in the app that came with it.

When your images have been transferred to your computer, you are likely going to want to process them a little bit. This is especially true if you have a DSLR or other high-end point-and-shoot which takes RAW images. These can be quite large and are not compatible with Instagram.

Most images taken with a camera are quite large in size, so you are going to need to use an image editing program like Adobe Photoshop, or free tools like Pixlr to process them. What you are looking to do is to crop your images so that they are square.

If you are used to the advanced photo editing features, then do your edits before cropping. When you crop your images you should crop or resize them so that they are 640X640 pixels. This is the size of all images taken using Instagram's camera app.

Also, be sure to save the images as JPEGs, as this is the image format used by most smartphone cameras.

2. Save processed images in their own folder

It helps to create a folder somewhere on your hard drive (we recommend in the same folder where you save all of your other folders) that is specifically for images you want to post on Instagram.

When you have processed and edited the images to your liking, save the images here. Try using an easy to use file name like the date and a letter or note so you can easily tell which images are which, so you know which to use.

3. Move the images to your device

You can move images using the cloud or by manually transferring the images to your phone. If you decide to manually transfer your files, you will need to plug your device into your computer.

For users with iPhones, you can open iTunes and click on your device followed by Photos. Then select the box beside Sync photos from. Select the file you created in the step above and then Sync to transfer the images over.

For users with Android devices, plug your phone into the computer and drag the folder you created in the step above into the Photos folder of your Android device.

For Windows Phone users, plug your device into your computer and open My Computer on your desktop. You should see your device listed in the window that opens. Open the file system for your device and drag the image files you created above into the Photos folder of your phone.

If you choose to use the cloud to transfer your files, use the operating system's cloud (e.g., iCloud, Google Drive, or OneDrive) to upload the files. Just be sure to use the same account as the one on your phone.

4. Add images to Instagram

Once the photos are either on your device, or in the cloud, you can now upload them to Instagram. This can be done by:
  1. Opening the app and tapping on the camera icon.
  2. Tapping on the button in the bottom left of the screen.
  3. Selecting where the image is located on your device. E.g., the Gallery app if you placed the photos in your phone's hard drive, or the cloud service you used.
  4. Editing them as you see fit.
Once this is complete, you should be able to post your images as you usually do with any other Instagram image on your phone. Take the time to add filters, and hashtags as well as a good description before you post.

If you would like to learn more about using Instagram to share your images then get in touch and we will show you the advantages of the bigger picture.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Social Media
August 25th, 2014

Security_Aug18_BThe idea of Internet security is almost always being called into question. It seems like nearly every month there is a security breach where important information like usernames and passwords are stolen. The trend appears to be increasing, with an ever expanding number of accounts being hacked. In early August, news broke of possibly the biggest breach to date.

The latest big-scale breach

In early August, it emerged that a Russian hacker ring had amassed what is believed to be the biggest known collection of stolen account credentials. The numbers include around 1.2 billion username and password combinations, and over 500 million email addresses.

According to Hold Security, the company that uncovered these records, the information comes from around 420,000 sites. What is particularly interesting about this particular attack is that such a wide variety of sites were targeted when compared this with other attacks which tend to either attack large brand names or smaller related sites.

How did this happen?

Despite what many believe, this was not a one-time mass attack; all sites that were compromised were not attacked at the same time. Instead, the hacker ring - called the Cyber Vor - was likely working on amassing this data over months or longer. How they were able to amass this much information is through what's called a botnet.

Botnets are a group of computers infected by hackers. When the hackers establish a botnet, they attack computers with weak network security and try to infect them with malware that allows the hacker to control the computer. If successful, users won't even know their computer has been hacked and is being used by hackers.

Once this botnet is established, the hackers essentially tell the computers to try to contact websites to test the security. In this recent case, the computers were looking to see if the websites were vulnerable to a SQL injection. This is where hackers tell the computers in the botnet to look for fillable sections on sites like comment boxes, search boxes, etc. and input a certain code asking the website's database to list the stored information related to that box.

If the Web developer has restricted the characters allowed in the fillable text boxes, then the code likely would not have worked. The botnet would notice this, and then move onto the next site. However, if the code works, the botnet notes this and essentially alerts the hacker who can then go to work collecting the data.

So, is this serious and what can I do?

In short, this could be a fairly serious problem. While 420,000 sites may seem like a large number, keep in mind that the Internet is made up of billions of websites. This means that the chances of your website's data being breached by this ring are small. That being said, there is probably a good chance that one of the sites related to your website may have been breached.

So, it is a cause for concern. However, you can limit the chance of hackers gaining access to your information and a website's information.

1. Change all of your passwords

It seems like we say this about once a month, but this time you really should heed this warning. With 1.2 billion username and password combinations out there, there is a chance your user name for at least one account or site has been breached.

To be safe, change all of your passwords. This also includes passwords on your computer, mobile devices, and any online accounts - don't forget your website's back end, or hosting service. It is a pain to do, but this is essential if you want to ensure your data and your website is secure from this attack.

2. Make each password different

We can't stress this enough, so, while you are resetting your password you should aim to ensure that you use a different one for each account, site, and device. It will be tough to remember all of these passwords, so a manager like LastPass could help. Or, you could develop your own algorithm or saying that can be easily changed for each site. For example, the first letter of each word of a favorite saying, plus the first and last letter of the site/account, plus a number sequence could work.

3. Test your website for SQL injection

If you have a website, you are going to want to test all text boxes to see if they are secure against SQL injection. This can be tough to do by yourself, so it's best to contact a security expert like us who can help you execute these tests and then plug any holes should they be found.

4. Audit all of your online information

Finally, look at the information you have stored with your accounts. This includes names, addresses, postal/zip codes, credit card information, etc. You should only have the essential information stored and nothing else. Take for example websites like Amazon. While they are secure, many people have their credit card and billing information stored for easy shopping. If your account is hacked, there is a good chance hackers will be able to get hold of your card number.

5. Contact us for help

Finally, if you are unsure about the security of your accounts, business systems, and website, contact us today to see how our security experts can help ensure your vital data is safe and sound.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Security
August 20th, 2014

iPhone_Aug18_BToday, more than ever before, business owners and managers are relying on their iPhone to keep contact information on hand. But depending solely on your iPhone to store vital data has its drawbacks as people move and change their numbers all the time. So here are five essential apps that’ll keep your iPhone’s address book versatile for contact management and recovery.

Five essential apps to boost your iPhone address book’s capabilities:

  1. Contacts+ (Free): This app lets you sort contacts into groups and import personal information from Facebook and LinkedIn. A quick tap lets you jump to a contact’s social networking profile, or even map a live route to their home or office. It also adds birthdays to your contact list.
  2. Sync.ME (Free): Sync.ME brings widgets to your iPhone’s Contacts app, adding a powerful set of tools that let you do everything from capturing business cards by photograph to recording some phone calls. This is particularly helpful when it comes to recalling previous conversations and connecting names with faces.
  3. Cloze (Free): Cloze compiles Twitter updates, Facebook posts, LinkedIn snippets, text messages and emails from each of your contacts, then combines all of it into one master feed, organized by person rather than by time. It automatically figures out who the most important people in your network are and puts their information at the top of the feed.
  4. ABBYY Business Card Reader (USD $5.99): Contrary to today’s digital world, old-school business cards are still an essential. And while transcribing cards into digital data is time consuming, ABBY does exactly that in a flash. Just snap a photo of each card and this scanning system instantly does the translation work, bringing contact information on business cards right into your iPhone’s address book.
  5. iCloud (Free): iCloud is Apple's cloud storage app that everyone with an Apple account has access to. Chances are high that when you first setup your device, you signed up for an Apple account in order to purchase/download apps from iTunes. On your device, open the Settings app and select iCloud. Enable it and login with your Apple account and you should be able to backup important data, including contacts. If you lose your device, or get a new one, simply log into your account again, and your contacts should pop right up.
While iPhone’s address book is a convenient tool for contact management, proofing it with these applications will not only make it more powerful but also more secure, so you won’t have to worry about losing your contact information or missing out on updated information again. Looking to learn more about iPhone and its features? Contact us today and see how we can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic iPhone
August 14th, 2014

iPad_Aug11_BThe iPad has become one of the most favorite devices of business owners and managers the world over. While the usability and mobility of these devices is almost unparalleled, there are some common issues that crop up. One of the biggest, is that it can be somewhat confusing to keep track of all the apps you've installed. If you have come across this issue, here are three ways you can find your apps.

1. Finding installed apps via Settings

While there is no set section of the iPad's Settings that allows you to view installed apps, you can actually view installed apps by looking at the Usage section. This section tells users how much storage space installed apps are using, therefore giving you a list of installed apps.

You can access the Usage section of Settings by:

  1. Opening the Settings panel on your iPad.
  2. Tapping on General.
  3. Selecting Usage.
This will list the apps you have installed, organized by how much hard drive space they are using. What's great about this method is that you can not only see the apps you have installed but also see if there are apps you aren't using, or apps that are taking up valuable space. You can also select apps to learn more about how much memory they are using and even uninstall an app should you not need it anymore.

2. Finding installed apps via Spotlight

If you have iOS 7 on your iPad you can view all installed apps via the Spotlight feature. Spotlight allows you to search your iPad for files, folders, apps, and more, and can be accessed by swiping down from the top of the screen when looking at the Home screen.

You can see what apps you have installed using Spotlight by:

  1. Opening Spotlight by sliding down from the top of your iPad's screen.
  2. Tapping on the blank spot beside the magnifying glass.
  3. Typing "." (period/full stop) without the quotations.
You should see a list of your installed apps come up, though there is no apparent way they are organized. If you tap on an app name, it will open.

3. Finding installed apps via iTunes

The other way you can find out the apps you have installed is via iTunes. You can do this by:
  1. Plugging your iPad into your computer via the cord that came with the device.
  2. Opening iTunes, if it doesn't open automatically when you connect it.
  3. Clicking on the device's name under Devices.
  4. Selecting Apps.
You will be able to search for apps, or you should see a full list of installed apps. The great thing about this feature is that if you search for apps, you should see where they are on your device's screen. From there you can move the apps around, or even delete them.

If you are looking to learn more about using the iPad, please contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic iPad
August 13th, 2014

Offie_Aug11_BIt’s undeniable that Microsoft Excel is one of the most popular spreadsheet applications used by businesses today. Not only does it simplify the process of creating spreadsheets with complex built-in formulas and colorful, descriptive charts, but it also allows you to add headers and footers. Let’s take a look at what headers and footers are and how you can make use of them in Excel.

What are headers and footers?

As with Word, Headers and footers are lines of text that print at the top (header) and bottom (footer) of each page in an Excel spreadsheet. They often contain descriptive text such as titles, dates, or page numbers displayed in page layout views and on printed pages.

Headers and footers are useful in providing quick information about your document or data in a predictable format and also help set out different parts of a document. Simply put, they make calculations, graphs, and pivot tables much easier to read and follow.

How to add and remove headers and footers:

  1. Select the spreadsheet for which you want to add headers or footers.
  2. On the Insert tab in the Text group, click Header & Footer; this displays the spreadsheet in page layout view.
  3. To add a header or footer, click on the left, right or center of the Header or Footer text box at the top or bottom of the spreadsheet page.
  4. You can now add a preset header or footer to your document, or create a custom header and footer.
  5. To start a new line in a header or footer text box, press ENTER; to include a single ampersand (&) in the text of a header or footer, use two ampersands. When you are done, click anywhere in the spreadsheet to close Header or Footer.
  6. Return to Normal page view by clicking on the View tab and Normal button.
  7. To remove the header or footer from a spreadsheet, select the View tab and click on Page Layout. Delete the information you want to remove.
The next time you need to repeat text on a page to make information more organized and easier to digest, you can simply do so with Excel's header and footer feature. Looking to learn more about Microsoft Office and its features? Contact us today and see how we can help.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

August 7th, 2014

Security_Aug05_BWhen it comes to business security, many small to medium business owners and managers often struggle to ensure that their systems and computers are secure from the various attacks and malware out there. While there are a million and one things you can do to secure systems, one of the most useful approaches is to be aware of common security threats. To help, here are five common ways your systems can be breached.

1. You are tricked into installing malicious software

One of the most common ways a system's security is breached is through malware being downloaded by the user. In almost every case where malware is installed the reason is because the user was tricked into downloading it.

A common trick used by hackers is to plant malware in software and then place this software on a website. When a user visits the site, they are informed that they need to download the software in order for the site to load properly. Once downloaded, the malware infects the system. Other hackers send emails out with a file attached, where only the file contains malware.

There are a nearly limitless number of ways you can be tricked into downloading and installing malware. Luckily, there are steps you can take to avoid this:

  • Never download files from an untrusted location - If you are looking at a website that is asking you to download something, make sure it's from a company you know about and trust. If you are unsure, it's best to avoid downloading and installing the software.
  • Always look at the name of the file before downloading - Many pieces of malware are often disguised with file names that are similar to other files, with only a slight spelling mistake or some weird wording. If you are unsure about the file then don't download it. Instead, contact us as we may be able to help verify the authenticity or provide a similar app.
  • Stay away from torrents, sites with adult content, and movie streaming sites - These sites often contain malware, so it is best to avoid them altogether.
  • Always scan a file before installing it - If you do download files, be sure to get your virus scanner to scan these before you open the apps. Most scanners are equipped do this, normally by right-clicking on the file and selecting Scan with….

2. Hackers are able to alter the operating system settings

Many users are logged into their computers as admins. Being an administrator allows you to change any and all settings, install programs, and manage other accounts.

If a hacker manages to access your computer and you are set up as the admin, they will have full access to your computer. This means they could install other malicious software, change settings or even completely hijack the machine. The biggest worry about this however, is if a hacker gets access to a computer that is used to manage the overall network. Should this happen, they could gain control over all the systems on the network and do what they please on it.

In order to avoid this, you should ensure that if a user doesn't need to install files or change settings on the computer, they do not have administrator access. Beyond this, installing security software like anti-virus scanners and keeping them up to date, as well as conducting regular scans, will help reduce the chances of being infected, or seeing infections spread.

3. Someone physically accesses your computer

It really feels like almost every security threat these days is digital or is trying to infect your systems and network from the outside. However, there are many times when malware is introduced into systems, or data is stolen, because someone has physically had access to your systems.

For example, you leave your computer on when you go for lunch and someone walks up to it, plugs in a USB drive with malware on it and physically infects your system. Or, it could be they access your system and manually reset the password, thereby locking you out and giving them access.

What we are trying to say here is that not all infections or breaches arrive via the Internet. What we recommend is to ensure that you password protect your computer - you need to enter a password in order to access it. You should also be sure that when you are away from your computer it is either turned off, or you are logged off.

Beyond that, it is a good idea to disable drives like CD/DVD and connections like USB if you don't use them. This will limit the chances that someone will be able to use a CD or USB drive to infect your computer.

4. It's someone from within the company

We have seen a number of infections and security breaches that were carried out by a disgruntled employee. It could be that they delete essential data, or remove it from the system completely. Some have even gone so far as to introduce highly destructive malware.

While it would be great to say that every business has the best employees, there is always a chance a breach can be carried out by an employee. The most effective way to prevent this, aside from ensuring your employees are happy, is to limit access to systems.

Take a look at what your employees have access to. For example, you may find that people in marketing have access to finance files or even admin panels. The truth is, your employees don't need access to everything, so take steps to limit access to necessary systems. Combine this with the suggestions above - limiting admin access and installing scanners - and you can likely limit or even prevent employee initiated breaches.

5. Your password is compromised

Your password is the main way you can verify and access your accounts and systems. The issue is, many people have weak passwords. There has been a steady increase in the number of services that have been breached with user account data being stolen. If a hacker was to get a hold of say your username, and you have a weak password, it could only be a matter of time before they have access to your account.

If this happens, your account is compromised. Combine this with the fact that many people use the same password for multiple accounts, and you could see a massive breach leading to data being stolen, or worse - your identity.

It is therefore a good idea to use a separate password for each account you have. Also, make sure that the passwords used are strong and as different as possible from each other. One tool that could help ensure this is a password manager which generates a different password for each account.

If you are looking to learn more about ensuring your systems are secure, contact us today to learn about how our services can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Security
August 6th, 2014

BCP_Aug05_BMost IT experts will agree that in order for a business to survive, they need some sort of recovery or continuity plan in place. Regardless of the type of plan, or systems integrated, all systems need to have a back up mechanism. In the last article, we took a look at four tips to help improve your data backups, and continue this article with the final four.

5. Automate your backup

It can be tough to actually remember to back up your files, especially if your business is busy. Therefore, you could look into an automated backup solution. At the very least, you should set a schedule as to when backups are conducted and set what is being backed up. While this isn't a full automation, a schedule will help.

If you are using solutions like the cloud or NAS (Network Attached Storage), you can usually automate the process by selecting which files and folders to back up and when. The software that powers these solutions will then do this automatically.

Ideally, your backups should be carried out automatically to ensure your data is available should you need it. But you should check periodically to ensure that your data is actually being backed up. This is especially true if you are backing up other systems, as there have been cases where employees have become frustrated by the backup process and simply turned it off. The business owner, thinking their data was being backed up would be in for a bit of a shock when systems crashed, if this was the case.

6. Back up your backups

Redundancy of your backups is just as important as actually backing up your data. You should keep a backup of your backup in case something happens to your original backup. While this doesn't have to be carried out as often as the 'normal' backup, this should be done on a regular basis.

In order to really ensure backup redundancy we recommend that if your main backup is kept on-site, then the secondary backup should be on another storage medium that is kept off-site.

7. Don't forget data stored on non-physical drives

What we are referring to here is the data stored on different services like your email, social media, and non-physical locations. This is especially true if you say have you own servers. It's highly likely that there is data stored on these services as well, and should they go down and you haven't kept a backup, you may lose important information.

Essentially, think about critical data that is used in the company, but isn't physically kept on computers. It may feel like this is going a step too far with backups, especially for businesses who use email services like Exchange and Gmail. However, while the chances of these systems going down are incredibly rare, it could still happen. Therefore, you should conduct a monthly to bi-yearly backup just to ensure that data is there somewhere should something happen.

8. Test your backups

Finally, it is beneficial to actually test your backups from time-to-time to ensure that they are not only working but the data is actually recoverable. If you do a trial run on recovering your data, you can get a good idea of how long it will take to retrieve this information when you actually need to recover it. You can then take steps to optimize this and let the relevant people know.

Also, testing is a good way to discover any problems, e.g., if someone has disabled backups, or one solution isn't working. This will ensure that your data is there when you need it.

If you are looking to integrate a data backup solution, contact us today to see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.